amuse me

a collection of images that inspired my eye.

Fantastica's image journal

fantasticalondon.com

"Every human needs a certain degree of sentimentality to feel free.."

Throughout his career as a designer, Josef Frank sought to forge a modernism that was responsive to people’s needs, both physical and psychological. His furniture was comfortable—he typically used soft, upholstered seating, rounded edges, and pieces that allowed their users to relax. He rejected the then common practice of employing tubular steel, which Frank thought was cold to the touch and unyielding. But his designs also sought to respond to our need for the familiar. He did not reject older, historical forms. He believed that many things and ideas from the past still had validity. And he often relied on color and pattern to make his rooms and individual pieces appealing.

http://www.meublepeint.com/josef_frank_english_version.htm

Josef Frank dealt early on with public housing and housing estates. Contrary to most other architects of the interwar period in Vienna, he took the idea of settlement and not the creation of so-called super blocks in the municipal housing. He also rejected facade decor and clearly preferred functional forms. The Viennese architect and furniture designer Luigi Blue refers to him as one of his idols. In addition to his architectural work he created numerous designs for furniture, furnishings, fabrics,wallpaper and carpet. He has been a painter, as well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josef_Frank_(architect)

DUFFY: The Man Who Shot the Sixties (Full length film) ↘

In her teaching Gunta applied ideas from modern art that she acquired in the classes ofJonannes Itten (color theory), Paul Klee (visual thinking) and Wassily Kandinsky(abstract art) into a new weaving practice. Bauhaus’ Weaving department at the time did not offer much for her to learn technically. Her and other students took courses and learned the craft outside of the school, soon becoming experts. Lack of technical guidelines allowed her and her colleagues to question and experiment with different materials and techniques, allowing them to make the step from traditional textile techniques and weaving done by generations before to the new weaving that would become admired by generations after.

http://www.textileartist.org/textile-artist-gunta-stolzl-1897-1983/

In her teaching Gunta applied ideas from modern art that she acquired in the classes ofJonannes Itten (color theory), Paul Klee (visual thinking) and Wassily Kandinsky(abstract art) into a new weaving practice. Bauhaus’ Weaving department at the time did not offer much for her to learn technically. Her and other students took courses and learned the craft outside of the school, soon becoming experts. Lack of technical guidelines allowed her and her colleagues to question and experiment with different materials and techniques, allowing them to make the step from traditional textile techniques and weaving done by generations before to the new weaving that would become admired by generations after.

http://www.textileartist.org/textile-artist-gunta-stolzl-1897-1983/

Grayson Perry studio visit